Teachers’ Pay – The Facts

Downing Street meeting

Teachers are not badly paid but they are underpaid:
Average teacher pay has fallen by £6000 over the last 10 years from £42,500 to £36,500.
Teacher pay is significantly below that of private sector graduates in every region of Britain. It is most acute in London, the SE and Eastern where it is 25% behind. In all, teachers have seen headline pay rise by only 4% since 2010.
Cost of living is rising:
Like everyone else, few teachers under 45 own their own home and the cost of rents is high and keeps rising. Rents have risen by 15% since 2010. CPI (an inflation measure) is now 2.9%
There is a growing shortage of teachers
There is both a recruitment and a retention problem.
More teachers are leaving the profession than ever before more than 50,000 left last year often burnt out by long hours and too little trust. Only 10,000 retired which is the lowest number for many years and has fallen by 40%, but the number walking out on the job has risen by 37%.
The Government missed their teacher recruitment target for the fourth year running, they were short by 20,000 teachers last year.
The vacancy rate has increased by 165% since 2010
In London, a quarter of schools have posts that they haven’t been able to fill with a permanent teacher and they are having to rely on supply teachers.

Come to The Carnival Against Cuts

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Carnical Cuts

The biggest challenge we face is the progressive reduction in funding for schools.

The government has focused on its National Funding Formula, but this is the tip of the iceberg. Schools are feeling the pinch now with ‘flat cash’ funding unable to keep up with spiralling costs – and this is before the new Funding Formula is introduced.  It would be great to see you at the Carnival Against Cuts on July 16. Fair Funding For All Schools. The event is a parent-led campaign to ensure that schools across the nation are properly funded.

During the recent election cuts became a hot local issue in many areas of the country. In Sutton we held our own public meeting with Union Reps from the GMB and NUT and a local headteacher. Representatives of the Labour, Lib Dem, and Green parties attended and there was a good discussion of funding, cuts, testing and selection.

Locally, it has been a busy end to the year, with schools looking closely at budgets and staffing. Primaries continue to academise in Sutton, whilst the Local Authority has been reduced to a few officers in the Civic Centre commissioning services through the newly-formed Sutton Education Services.

With this picture of fragmentation, it lies with the Unions to provide a sense of coherence for teachers working in Sutton. The formation of the NEU from the ATL and the NUT is a major step forward in achieving this.

Why the Budget was a missed opportunity to fix the school funding crisis

It is clear that  this Budget has nothing to offer existing schools.

The NAHT secretary Russell Hobby writes:

‘More than 80 per cent of school budgets are spent on staffing, so it is clear that the £3 billion of savings the government expects schools to find will result in fewer school staff.

This cannot help but have negative consequences, often for the most vulnerable. Class sizes will increase, the curriculum will narrow, training will be cut and support for struggling children will be reduced. The UK is one of the wealthiest countries in the world – how can we tell our children that there is no money to spare for them?

For school leaders watching the Budget, the anger will be two-fold: nothing is being provided for existing schools, despite the evident pressures they are under; but the government can find resources for new free schools to deliver its new grammar plans.

When the system is struggling to deliver sufficient resources for existing schools, it is fundamentally the wrong priority to allocate greater resources to schools that have not been created yet, and that will not provide help where there is the greatest need.

What could the chancellor have offered today? The National Audit Office highlights a funding shortfall of £3 billion due to the real terms cuts schools face. This would have been ambitious, but an investment, rather than a cost.

But other simpler and cheaper options were open to the Treasury. Part of the frustration from school leaders is that their costs have been rising because of actions taken by the government – rising national insurance contributions, increasing pension costs, the national living wage and, from April, the apprenticeship levy. The government is giving with one hand and taking with the other.

They have the levers to address this. Why not exempt schools from the apprenticeship levy? Or ensure all schools get the pupil premium they are entitled to through auto registering pupils for free school meals?’

Read the full article here: Philip Hammond’s 2017 Budget will be remembered as a missed opportunity for education

Sutton headteachers urge parents to lobby MPs over school funding cuts

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Education editor, The Guardian

A letter sent to all parents of secondary schoolchildren in the Liberal Democrat-controlled borough of Sutton, south-west London, states: “The future looks bleak. Next year means more expenses for schools. Inflation is increasing too. Local authority cuts mean that schools are expected to do more with less.”

Secondary classroom

The letter explains the cause of budget pressures the schools face and criticises the government and Department for Education’s claims to have protected “core schools funding” with record levels of funding nationally.

“Schools will have to consider fewer teachers, larger classes, less choice, less support for students and families, fewer opportunities, trips or co-curricular activities. In some areas of the country, schools are already cutting school hours. Others are suggesting a four-day week to reduce staffing demand and utility bills,” the letter tells parents.

The schools are unhappy at Sutton council proposals to slice 0.5% off funds it currently devolves to secondary and primary schools. That would come on top of reductions in funding for sixth-form education by central government, cuts in education services grants, and increases in wages, national insurance and pension contributions to be paid by schools.

Read more here: The Guardian

 

Joint Unions Statement on School Funding From ASCL, ATL, NAHT, NUT & Voice

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The Government’s long-awaited and much-delayed plans for reform of school funding will not solve the funding crisis facing schools and colleges. Our organisations, representing the overwhelming majority of teachers and school leaders, believe that the Government must provide additional resources to support any changes to school funding.

The Government says it is protecting the education budget. School funding is in fact frozen, but inflationary factors mean that schools face the biggest real terms cuts in a generation. Schools and colleges are also being hit by costs relating to higher employer pension and national insurance contributions, the new apprenticeship levy and changes to curriculum and assessment. The impact of Government funding policy on high needs provision is also creating great concern, with changes to early years funding resulting in cuts in some areas and putting providers and local authorities under serious pressure.

cutsWe urgently need additional investment in school buildings to cope with increasing pupil numbers. Cuts to health, social care, welfare and local authority funding – including removal of the Education Services Grant – all affect schools. Post 16 education is in an even worse position, as these pressures come on top of large cuts in the last parliament.

We are already seeing job losses, increased class sizes and cuts to courses in our schools and colleges. Instead, we need to invest more – including in teacher pay – to respond to a crisis in teacher recruitment and retention. Any reform to funding arrangements must recognise the need for additional funding, tackle existing shortages and ensure an equitable distribution so that every child and young person has access to what they need to succeed.

Our future depends on developing the skills of our children and young people. Education is an investment in our economic future, but the Government is cutting already inadequate funding. Our organisations call upon the Government to change course and to give our schools and colleges the resources they need.

Mary Bousted, General Secretary, ATL
Kevin Courtney, General Secretary, NUT
Russell Hobby, General Secretary, NAHT
Deborah Lawson, General Secretary, Voice
Malcolm Trobe, Interim General Secretary, ASCL

How will your school be affected? Click here: School Cuts

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Sutton Schools Face £6m Cuts

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The NUT has today launched a national campaign against cuts to school budgets.

If the Government’s funding proposals go through almost every school in the country will have less money to pay for teachers and resources. Sutton faces cuts of £6,303,562.

You can find out how your school is affected here: School Cuts

What you can do
Our aim is to persuade the government to change its plans for school funding. Use the links on the page at School Cuts  for your school to:

  • Sign the petition
  • Use social media to make your colleagues, friends and the wider community aware of the threat to children’s education and teachers’ jobs.
  • Write to your MP to express your concerns.
  • Come to the rally on 17th November.

 

The NUT is Striking to Defend Our Schools

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13510920_1703722046547511_7195364799634482668_nThe Government’s new Education for All Bill continues to show they have the wrong priorities for teachers, schools and children.

Sutton schools have had to face a 15% real-terms funding cut over the last few years and face a further 5% under the government’s so-called ‘fairer funding’ formula. Sutton already has the fourth highest number of classes with over 30 pupils in outer London, and this figure could get larger as funding is reduced.

Real term cuts in funding will have major effects on schools and teachers, whether academy or maintained. This will further erode terms and conditions, increase workload and impede pay progression for teachers.

As more schools become academies, the coverage of the national School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document and Burgundy Book will narrow and these protections will gradually wither away. This makes teaching a less attractive profession, compounding teacher shortages.

The NUT is asking the Government not to implement the real terms cuts that will affect ALL schools. Primary schools and small schools suffer disproportionately when funding is cut, and even academies will be hit hard.

UPDATE

The NUT’s three conditions to Ms Morgan for cancelling the strike are:

  1. Fund schools sufficiently to cover the growing staff costs imposed on them, such as increased National Insurance contributions.
  2. Tell academies they must at least have regard to national terms and conditions.
  3. Promise meaningful talks to look for a full resolution of the dispute.

 

 

 

Teachers At John Fisher School to Strike Over Broken Pay Promise

Members of the National Union of Teachers at The John Fisher School have voted overwhelmingly to take strike action following a breakdown of talks John Fisherwith the management of the school. Teachers will strike on 8th March after being refused merit pay rises under the performance pay system.

Teachers successfully went through the appraisal process but were shocked to find that they were turned down because the school claimed it had spent the money on other things and couldn’t afford to pay.

Union representatives were told that unexpected costs and parents failing to pay £60,000 into the school fund meant that the school could not afford the pay progression of teaching staff.

John Fisher NUT Rep. Richard McKenzie said:

‘Last year teachers worked very hard to achieve the best for the boys at John Fisher School. They were assessed on the work they did and were found to be good, with some being outstanding.

We fully expected the pay progression which the school promised us under our performance scheme. But we were told by the head teacher that the school had no money to pay us.

We appealed and asked the head to reconsider, but the reply was the same. Finally, after the head failed reach agreement with union representatives, we decided to take strike action.

What we want is the salary we which is due to us  – and which the school budgeted  for a year ago. the teachers have fulfilled their responsibilities to full – the school must do the same.

Sutton NUT Secretary Andy Gibbons said: ‘We are told by the government that teachers will be rewarded for hard work – but this is the reality. We have consistently tried to get the school to pay the teachers the money they were promised. We go on strike as a last resort, but our members are determined to get what is their due.

‘We will continue to keep the door open for talks, but unless our members in the school are treated fairly the strike action will continue. I appeal to the Head Teacher and the Governing Body  – pay your staff what they are owed and end this dispute now.’

Sign the petition at

Support John Fisher teachers